THE UNDERGROUND X-RAY RECORDS OF THE SOVIET UNION

This piece was originally published March 25th, 2013.

Soviet X Ray Records IconIt’s easy to take entertainment for granted.

In our present day we have the ability to purchase and enjoy so many recreational items: play a video game, listen to whatever it is we want, watch whatever we want, and, though there are still many folks out there who wish they could control our choices, read any books we can find.

Folks happily embrace the technology that has made obtaining our selections quick, simple and affordable, and we think nothing now of versions that exist only on the ether, or rather—on a cloud.

Still others, myself included, like to seek out older formats and what some will call obsolete mediums.

Some of these formats such as the vinyl LP have actually increased in their yearly sales and there are constantly new purveyors now marketing records, both for new album releases and reissuing older releases.

The annual April celebration event for small independent record shops around the world, Record Store Day, has increased popularity and made it a huge success. For many of these brick and mortar stores and the independent record labels that send exclusive items for sale on that day, it is their best retail day of the year.

Long thought dead formats such as 78 r.p.m. records, 8-track tapes, cassettes, VHS tapes and laser discs, still have numerous aficionados and collectors that will readily discuss at great length their obsessions and collections. In fact, there are even record labels, bands and filmmakers that choose to only release their output on some of these “antique” formats.

It wasn’t always this easy though…

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“Of Sounds And Something Else”: Remembering Music Producer TOM WILSON

This piece was originally published September 10th, 2012.

Tom Wilson Post Icon TemplateSeptember 6th marked the anniversary of the death in 1978 of one of music’s great producers of the 1950’s and 1960’s, Tom Wilson.

Although his name is not as familiar as that of say, Phil Spector, Brian Wilson or George Martin, his achievements and influence are profoundly important.

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Record producer and DJ Tom Wilson stands outside ABC Studios, in New York City,
promoting his radio show “The Music Factory” — June 21, 1967. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

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THE ENGLISH BEAT: FINALLY…THE COMPLETE BEAT!

This piece was originally published July 30th, 2012.

English BeatBirmingham, England has been called the birthplace of Heavy Metal.

Primarily since this industrial, largely working class city was home to Black Sabbath and later, Judas Priest.

However, though musically the city of Birmingham has stood in the shadows of both London and Liverpool as landmark cities in the U.K.’s rich musical timeline, it is just as illustrious, culturally vibrant and hugely important.

Birmingham’s musical scene in the 60’s was second greatest to Liverpool and while no city anywhere produced an act as world changing as The Beatles, Birmingham gave music The Nightriders/The Idle Race with first, Roy Wood and then Jeff Lynne, both of who became huge stars. Wood joined The Move, enlisted Lynne and then the two eventually transitioned the band into The Electric Light Orchestra (Roy Wood then formed Wizzard). There was The Moody Blues, Traffic, The Spencer Davis Group and in the 80’s Duran Duran, among many other notable acts that came form Birmingham.

Meanwhile back in the 70’s as punk rock caught on with England’s disenfranchised youth, so too did Reggae, Ska, Rocksteady and Dub music, which was always a part of the fabric of the nation’s heavy Jamaican populace since the 60’s anyway, as well as what many teenagers that gravitated towards punk rock also grew up listening to.

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